Provisioning some test storage accounts for class

I wanted to create a few storage accounts for students in my class to complete an assignment featuring Event Sourcing and Material Views.

So, here’s what I did.

Download/install the latest azure command line interface (cli).
(While doing this, I realized I could have just used the cloud shell. I soldiered on with the dl)

Create a resource group to contain the accounts we’d need.

Create the accounts and output the storage account keys
The command to make a single storage account is pretty straightforward:

But I wanted to also output the keys and display them on a single line. The command to get the keys after the account is created is this:

So, I used the jq program in bash to parse the json result and display both keys on a line. Thus, I created a script that would create the accounts and then output their storage account keys.
This is the script that produced the accounts and keys:

Overall, the longest part of the exercise was dealing with the way the files were being saved in windows vs how they were being saved and read by bash. But the accounts were created and class can get on with assignment 2.

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Exploring the differences between SaaS, PaaS and IaaS

In Cloud Technologies class today, we used both the course outline and the notes from MSFTImagine’s Github repo to talk through the differences in service offering.

I used the canonical service model responsibility chart to start the conversation off.

servicemodeldivisionofresponsibility
Service Model Division of Responsibility, via MSFTImagine on Github.

It’s fairly straightforward to talk to these divisions, of course. I often use it to drive home the NIST 2011 definition of cloud services. With emphasis on the service delivery models.

In today’s presentation, one of the things that jumped out at me was the slide that provided a distinction between SaaS Cloud Storage and IaaS.

distinctionbetweensaasandiaas
SaaS or IaaS, via MSFTImagine on Github.

Finally, when talking about the ever versatile Salesforce, and how its PaaS solution works out it reminded me of the Online Accommodation Student Information System (OASIS 🙂 ) that I had built when I was in undergrad.

I’d built OASIS as a commission for the Office of Student Advisory Services. It was a tool to help off-campus students more easily find accommodation. Prior to OASIS all the information was a notebook in an office. It was built before I learnt about the utility-based computing of cloud. I’m thinking about using that as the basis of an exploration of the architectural changes need to move an old service to the cloud.

Hopefully, I’ll be able to revisit it when we touch on Cloud Design Patterns.

Cloud Technologies – 2017. Ready, class 1

Started back with the UWI Cloud Technologies course today. This class was an Introduction to Cloud generally, with some conversation about the course outline and expectations for assignments.

We still in the process of confirming the course outline, so I’ll share that next week. But I used the slides from the technical resources provided by the Azure Computer Science module on cloud technology.

On my way to class I met up with Naresh who runs the UWI’s Department of Computing and Information Technology servers. He gave me a quick tour of their deployment. I’m looking forward to him sharing some stories from setting up that environment in our IaaS classes in a few weeks.

Recommended reading for today’s class is Consumption Economics: The New Rules of Tech