Teaching Cloud Technologies (2016/2017)

We just concluded another run of the Cloud Technologies course at the University of the West Indies. This course is part of the MSc Computer Science program.

As lecturer, I had to come up with the course outline as well as the content. In so doing, I get the opportunity to refresh what we talk about as well as how we approach assignments.

This course comprised of ten modules:

  1. Intro to Cloud Technologies
  2. Cloud computing infrastructure
  3. Virtualization
  4. Big data
  5. Cloud development patterns
  6. Cloud resource management
  7. IaaS Automation
  8. Microservices
  9. IoT
  10. Cloud for Research

Though our primary cloud platform is Microsoft Azure, students are free during assignments and project submission to use other cloud providers.

One of the assignments involves virtual machine scale sets and containers. The draught goes like this:

Z. Zanko Systems provide sales processing systems for large commercial banks.

They receive more than 5 million JSON requests per hour (revised to 300,000).
Each request must be stored in permanent storage. The format of the request is:
“{“TransactionID”:”1″,”UserId”:”A1″,”SellerID”:”S1″,”Product Name”:”Financial Trap”,”Sale Price”:1000000,”Transaction Date”:” “}”

You have been hired as a System Developer by Zanko. You have access to VMs whose capacity is equal to that of A1 VMs in Azure IaaS or Containers of similar capacity.

Develop a mechanism to generate the requests your system faces.

Design and implement a solution using a container-based approach or a
virtual machine-based one to process 5 million requests in an hour.
For your receivers introduce a failure rate.
Store the occurrence of failures.
Justify how you chose to store and monitor failures.

Though most students can build this out using azure, one enterprising student chose to use AWS and reading his submission was a nice view of getting this done using Amazon’s resources vs Azure.

This year, Microsoft put a halt to the Azure for Education Academic grant, but did have a number of other ways for students to get into cloud, including DreamSpark and other offers.

The project component this year changed a bit, too. In the two years prior, we asked students to build working cloud services themselves. This year, we asked them to propose a cloud service that featured understanding of:

  • Cloud service definition
  • Cloud service models
  • Cloud delivery models
  • Cloud for research
  • Cloud development with a regional focus

We saw some excellent solutions that we hope to hear more about in the future.

Teaching Cloud

I’m lecturing at the University of the West Indies this year.  I’ll be teaching the MSc. course in Cloud Technologies.  This year, I’ll be working along with Alysia Huggins. She’ll be bringing expertise in distributed systems to the course, but not just that, some very cool approaches.

  • We’re looking to have more interaction from professionals, so there’ll be in-class Skyping, interviews and assignments that require our students to get out and look around at what’s happening in the region ’round Cloud Technologies.

Their first assignment will be to take a look at IaaS and start to answer the question, “Is the West Indies ready for building/deploying it’s own IaaS services”?

Teaching (again)

Last year, I taught three courses.

  • Intro to Mobile Applications
  • Software Engineering
  • Cloud Technologies

I hadn’t done any lecturing for a while, and the opportunities came around fairly suddenly, but it was good to be back in class and sharing experiences. Mobile Apps & Software Engineering were taught at the University of Trinidad & Tobago.

I’ve found that interacting with the students and faculty is excellent for understanding how important the relationship between industry & practitioners and institutions can be.

That’s it for now, but I’ll write on Cloud Technologies another time.